Mascarpone from 35% cream at home

Category: Dairy and egg dishes
Mascarpone from 35% cream at home

Ingredients

Cream 1 l
Lemon acid ¼ h. L.

Cooking method

  • In addition, you will need a clean kitchen, linen towel, a colander, and a saucepan.
  • 1. Pour 1 liter of cream into a clean, dry saucepan, heat to 75 ° C.

  • 2. ¼ teaspoon of citric acid diluted with water 1 tsp, pour into the cream. Stir gently with a whisk over very low heat, 10 minutes.
  • 3. Fold the towel in 2 layers (without seams), put in a colander with a bowl and pour the cream.
  • 4. Stir slightly so that the serum can separate better.
  • 5. and refrigerate for 3-4 hours, you can overnight.
  • 6. Remove from the refrigerator, scoop out the mascarpone from the colander.
  • 7. The towel absorbs almost all the whey, 1-2 tbsp remains in the bowl. spoons
  • 8. From this amount of cream, 600-650 grams of mascarpone is obtained.
  • Store homemade mascarpone for no more than 3 days in a glass container in the refrigerator.

Note

I must say right away that the recipe is not mine, I read it on the "Culinary Club" forum (registration is required).
🔗

It seems to me that homemade mascarpone is even tastier than store-bought.
I did it - now I do it all the time, so tiramisu is a favorite dessert for the holidays and there are many other sweets with mascarpone.

Bon Appetit!!!

Photo Hairpin

Masya_
Lyulek I want to try homemade mascarpone.
75 C - do you measure with a thermometer? if not, how can you determine the right moment?
Pour the ready-made mixture with lemon to-one on a towel, with which to line a colander - do I understand correctly?
6. Remove from the refrigerator, scoop the mascarpone out of the colander.
that is, scoop out of the towel - yes?
And the last question - will it come out of market cream? do not know?
Lyulek
Quote: Masya_

Lyulek I want to try homemade mascarpone.
75 C - do you measure with a thermometer? if not, how can you determine the right moment?
Pour the ready-made mixture with lemon to-one on a towel, with which to line a colander - do I understand correctly? that is, scoop out of the towel - yes?
And the last question - will it come out of market cream? do not know?

At first I measured with a thermometer, and now by eye. As soon as bubbles appear on the surface, remove from heat, add acid and put on low heat again, stirring constantly.
a colander (preferably plastic, so as not to spoil the towel with rust), line it with a towel and pour out the contents of the saucepan.
Place in the cold, you can stir it a couple of times.
And then scoop out of the towel.
The mass will not be homogeneous: thick at the edges, liquid in the center.
Everything will mix in a glass jar and thicken in the refrigerator.
Therefore, do not strain the mascarpone to a very thick consistency. It should have a consistency of 20% sour cream.
I didn’t try cream from the market: I made only 35% of Pereyaslav-Khmelnitsky. ...
For the first time, try to make them from Pereyaslavl to see how such a cheese should look and how it should taste. And then you will make from bazaars.
I'm looking forward to the report.
Dakota
I found an interesting thing here.
Since childhood, my grandmother spoiled us with village sour cream. such that the spoon does not just stand, but is stuck with effort. We call this sour cream MAY (probably in Tatar).

When shopping in stores, I periodically buy some new product for myself. Once it was mascarpOOOne (I like to chant it, in an Italian way). And then this thing was revealed.

Mascarpone and May are one and the same.

therefore, I think that if you let the cream ferment yourself (or help with some lactic acid leaven), it will be the same mascarpoone. Although the% fat content is in doubt. It will be higher in the village.
Lyulek
Quote: Dakota

therefore, I think that if you let the cream ferment yourself (or help with some lactic acid leaven), it will be the same mascarpoone. Although the% fat content is in doubt. It will be higher in the village.
Yes, it tastes similar, but slightly softer than sour cream.
The fat content of mascarpone is 60-70%.
Rina
Quote: Lyulёk

Yes, it tastes similar, but slightly softer than sour cream.
The fat content of mascarpone is 60-70%.
I was specifically interested in real fatty mascarpone. It turned out that somewhere around 30-40%. The claimed 60-70-80% is the fat content in dry matter.
Anyone who has a package can see what it says about the composition of 100 g of the product.

I get by with very fresh, non-acidic (!) Store sour cream thrown overnight (that is, the same cream, but fermented not with citric acid, but with lactic acid bacteria). Considering the amount of whey, the final product is close to 40% fat.
Lyulek
Quote: Rina72


I get by with very fresh, non-acidic (!) Store sour cream thrown overnight (that is, the same cream, but fermented not with citric acid, but with lactic acid bacteria). Considering the amount of whey, the final product is close to 40% fat.
Here's another recipe: how to make mascarpone. Perfectly.
I know what other girls make from cream and cottage cheese: there is a good recipe in the culinary club. But I did not try it, because this one is quite satisfactory and there is one ingredient, not two.
Girls who know more recipes for making mascarpone- bring everything here: we will try.
Nat_ka
I also recommend a recipe found on another site. I cooked - super! And you just need:

Cottage cheese 18% - 200 gr (I take the vanilla cheese mass) + 33% cream - 200 ml

1. Rub the cottage cheese through a sieve (preferably twice, do not rub the cheese curd).
2. Pour in cold cream.
3. Beat the mixture at low speed until creamy.
4. Cheese-cream "Mascarpone" is ready to use!
Try it!
Rina
Quote: Lyulёk

I know what other girls make with cream and cottage cheese
I was making a cheesecake, the original recipe of which is just mascarpone. I did it with thrown back sour cream - a very delicate uniform consistency. Another time I did (so that the fat content was less) from curd mass, very carefully wiped, and the same thrown back sour cream. So, there was a tangible difference. I compared these fillings with silk in the first case and velvet in the second. That is, in the case of the curd mass, I felt a curd texture (this despite the fact that everything was rubbed very carefully).

But I decided not to make cheesecakes anymore. Or do it, but from half the norm of products. It is very tasty, but after half a standard piece my body decisively declared "enough is enough!" ... An overly satisfying product turns out
Rezlina
Quote: Nat_ka

I also recommend a recipe found on another site. I cooked - super! And you just need:

Cottage cheese 18% - 200 gr (I take vanilla curd mass) + 33% cream - 200 ml

1. Rub the cottage cheese through a sieve (preferably twice, do not rub the cheese curd).
2. Pour in cold cream.
3. Beat the mixture at low speed until creamy.
4. Cream cheese "Mascarpone" is ready to use!
Try it!

Have you tried tiramisu?
NatalyaN
Quote: Masya_

And the last question - will it come out of market cream? do not know?
It worked, I tried it.
or
I tried it - it worked.
Lyulek
Quote: Rezlina

Have you tried tiramisu?
Tiramisu did! Super! it was for these purposes that she began to prepare mascarpone from cream
Svetl @ nka
Lyulek is a cool recipe, and most importantly economical
Rezlina
Quote: Lyulёk

Tiramisu did! Super! it was for these purposes that she began to prepare mascarpone from cream
Share the recipe, pliz
Qween
Rezlina , here, a very interesting topic about tiramisu-
https://Mcooker-enn.icdself.com/index.php@option=com_smf&Itemid=26&topic=7313.0
Lyulek
Quote: Rezlina

Share the recipe, pliz

Girls, I feel the story will be long.
I want to tell you about the two most favorite desserts in my family, in which MASCARPONE directly participates.



1. TIRAMISU

There are many legends about the "birth" of Tiramisu, and here is one of them:

At the end of the 17th century, this dessert was first prepared in Siena (Italy) in honor of the arrival of the Grand Duke of Tuscany, Cosimo III de 'Medici.A vain, wasteful lover of luxury, this historical character was also an excellent sweet tooth - he liked the dessert and was immediately dubbed "ducal soup".
The recipe wandered along with the ducal entourage and finally got to Florence, which at that time was flooded with intellectuals and artists from all over the world. This is how the "ducal soup" became known to foreigners. When he got to Venice, he became a favorite dessert of courtiers and the highest nobility, to a greater extent because of the stimulating effect attributed to this sweet dish. It has even become a habit to gorge itself on "duke's soup" before every love date - hence the name tiramisu - pick me up in English (in Russian, not a single literary word came to mind in this regard). That's the whole story.

As for the stimulating effect, one can argue - a slight invigorating effect is certainly present, coffee, after all, + chocolate. But the fact that tiramisu is an energy bomb is, without a doubt, only the "correct" mascarpone - 55% fat, plus sugar and biscuits.

There are a great many varieties of tiramisu.

TIRAMISU
Ingredients:
500 grams of mascarpone
80 grams of sugar (better than powder)
4 eggs
250 grams of honey macaroons ("ladies' fingers" / Savoy biscuit, just a biscuit or muffins cut into strips)
1 cup of strong espresso coffee
1 glass of Marsala sweet wine (or cognac, or rum, or Amaretto, or chocolate / coffee liqueur - just not for glasses, but a few spoons)
bitter cocoa powder
chocolate chips
Preparation:
Separate the yolks from the whites.
Beat the yolks with sugar until a white, airy mass.
Grind the mascarpone (room temperature) with a wooden spoon until smooth.
Combine the mascarpone with the sugar-yolk mass (also by hand).
Beat the whites with a little salt - stir gently into the cheese / yolks / sugar.
Mix sweet wine with coffee (if you use other alcohol, you can add water, the main thing is that the impregnation is enough for all the cookies - I did it with Amaretto (and on 5 yolks, by the way, without proteins), I levied the liquor so much that then everything became numb).
Quickly (so as not to creep out later) dip the biscuits in the impregnation and put them in the mold.
On top is a layer of cream + cocoa powder, and so on, the last layer is cream. Cocoa at the top can go spots, therefore (in order to hide the disgrace) I cover it with chocolate chips on top (chocolate is also better bitter).
In the refrigerator for 6 hours.
BISCUITS "SAVOYARD"

Ingredients:

3 large eggs (separate yolks from whites)
6 tbsp. l. Sahara
3/4 cup (250 ml) flour
6 tbsp. l. sah. powders


Heat the oven to 180 C, grease a baking sheet with oil and cover with baking paper (parchment).

Beat the cold whites until steep peaks. Add sugar one spoon at a time, whisking continuously. Bring the mass back to steep peaks.

Beat the yolks and gently insert them into the whites, stirring from bottom to top with a wooden spoon.

Add flour in parts, sifting directly into the bowl with the dough and stirring also from bottom to top with the same wooden spoon.
Put the dough in a pastry bag and squeeze those very "ladies' fingers" 12 cm long, 2 cm wide onto a baking sheet, leaving 2-3 cm between the cookies.

Sprinkle half the sugar on your fingers. powder. Wait 5 minutes until the dough absorbs this portion and sprinkle with the remaining powder.

Gently blow off or “sweep away” any powder that has gotten onto the paper.

Bake for 10 minutes without opening the oven.

Expand the baking sheet 180 g and bake for another 5 minutes until light golden brown.

Remove the cookies from the paper while they are still hot and let cool on wire racks.

My comments: I made Tiramisu according to different recipes: with and without yolks, and cold and heating. I settled on the above recipe: I and my guys liked it the most.

And now, girls, I want to show the 2nd culinary masterpiece with MASCARPONE. Our family "got hooked on him" and now they hardly get off. it is called "Mascarpone meringue roll". They are also taken from cooking from the well-known temka "Desserts by Michelle".
A source: 🔗

Here is the original text:

I thought for a long time what kind of introduction to the next dessert to make, but I could not find the right words to convey its extraordinary taste. Just imagine the combination of a delicate creamy mascarpone with coffee, and even with hazelnuts - mmm! In general, if you try it once, this roll will completely settle on your dessert table!

Mascarpone Meringue Roulade
4 squirrels
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 Art. granulated sugar (fine sugar)
1 tbsp. toasted and peeled hazelnuts
1 tsp starch
1 tsp vinegar
1 tsp vanilla essence

Filling:

150 g mascarpone
3 tbsp. l. Sahara
100 ml cream
1 tsp instant coffee
1 tsp hot water
Merengue roll.
Beat the egg whites and salt into a foam. Continuing to beat, add gradually (1 tablespoon each) sugar. Beat until a glossy white mass is obtained, while whipping keeps stable peaks when raising the whisk. Grind the hazelnuts and add them to the whipped meringues along with the vanilla essence, starch and vinegar. Gently mix everything in a circular motion, trying not to knock off the proteins.
Preheat oven to 300F (150C).
Line a baking sheet with parchment and lay out the meringues, making sure to form a uniform 9x13 "(23x33cm) rectangle.
Bake for about 20-25 minutes, or until the meringue is dry and browned. It is important not to overexpose the roll, because then it will become too dry and break when you try to roll it. If you get it ahead of time, then it will not separate from the parchment paper.
Turn the finished roll onto a clean sheet of parchment paper, let cool for 5 minutes and carefully remove the parchment on which it was baked.

Filling.
Dissolve coffee in hot water, let cool slightly and mix with mascarpone. Add sugar and mix well. Whisk in the cream and mix with the mascarpone.

Assembly.
Put the filling on the surface of the cooled meringue, flatten and roll into a roll, helping yourself with parchment paper. Chill the finished roll in the refrigerator for 30 minutes and serve.
The photo can be viewed on the link.

It is done very quickly, incredibly tasty !!! May Tortizhka forgive me

I already did 10 times for sure. I have been making a double portion for a long time, otherwise the roll will not survive even 3 hours.

There are some nuances: the glass in this recipe is American, that is, 230 ml, and I add strong natural coffee instead of instant coffee. But also very tasty with instant.
Lyulyok
Girls, if you're interested, I'll post a step-by-step photo of making Mascarpone meringue roll in the new Temka of this section.
Celestine
Quote: Lyulёk

Girls, if you're interested, I'll post a step-by-step photo of making Mascarpone meringue roll in the new Temka of this section.

Lilichka, I really need it, I'm going to do everything, but I can't imagine how I will roll the Mascarpon from meringue.
Lyulyok
I have already posted a step-by-step photo of the roll here:
https://Mcooker-enn.icdself.com/index.php@option=com_smf&topic=10226.0
Good luck!
Chantal
Quote: Lyulёk

It has even become a habit to gorge itself on "duke's soup" before every love date - hence the name tiramisu - pick me up in English (in Russian, not a single literary word came to mind in this regard).
pick up - if you translate literary, then "collect" if not very literary - then "take off, pick up" that is, in Russian the dessert should be called "take off (or pick up) me"
Lyulyok
Yes, in Italian, it will be more decent
Scarecrow
Quote: Rina72



I get by with very fresh, non-acidic (!) Store sour cream thrown overnight (that is, the same cream, but fermented not with citric acid, but with lactic acid bacteria). Considering the amount of whey, the final product is close to 40% fat.

Acid and bacteria make different things out of cream. Bacteria ferment cream exactly (a fermented milk product is obtained), and with acid - curdles (milk protein curdles). How is it more correct? How close to the original?


I read that in the cream they still add a leaven from bacteria (which question?) And leave the mascarpone to mature for several days (at what temperature?). This is longer, of course, and in general it is not a fact that something smart will turn out at home.

Respect for the lemon and cream idea.
Rina
As far as I know, bacteria produce lactic acid, which works in sour cream and many fermented milk products.Maybe from the point of view of pure biochemistry, the processes of fermentation with lemon and bacteria are different, from my point of view it is an acid, it is also an acid in Africa (food, of course). I don’t think in the old days mascarpone was made with citric acid or any other acid. Most likely, the same lactic acid bacteria worked, just with dry citric acid it is possible to achieve sterility of the product (these are the requirements of modern trade), and the final product is obtained faster (no need to wait until the acidity level of the cream reaches the required level).

Now I looked through the recipe with cream and lemon again. Yes, the result will be different and this difference will be important if the dessert must or can live uneaten for more than 1-2 days or the mascarpone needs to be prepared in advance. The fact is that cream with acid is heated to 75 degrees, and this is almost pasteurization. That is, if certain conditions are met (very clean dishes, a boiled or ironed towel), the cheese will turn out to be almost sterile.

In my case, there are several reasons for using sour cream.
1. Cream of 35% fat is sold only in one point accessible to me, but it can be problematic for me to get there on time.
2. I never cook cheese in advance.
3. Such desserts are not stale with us.
Hairpin
Lulek, I made it! More precisely, I tried ...

Only half (500 grams). Look, my result is similar to what should have happened ...

Mascarpone from 35% cream at home Mascarpone from 35% cream at home

But you still feel the cream in the taste ... Maybe the lemons were not enough? Or maybe she's a little old. I have a lemon - a veteran. It turned out 360 grams.
Lyulek
Quote: Hairpin

Lulek, I made it! More precisely, I tried ...

Only half (500 grams). Look, my result is similar to what should have happened ...

But you still feel the cream in the taste ... Maybe the lemons were not enough? Or maybe she's a little old. I have a lemon - a veteran. It turned out 360 grams.
Hairpin!
Excellent result!!!
And they feel the cream in a real mascarpone.
Hairpin
Now I will sing for the third assault on the meringue roll!
Lyulek
Good luck !!!
Celestine
Lilechka, don't you recognize?

🔗
Lyulek
Celestine, I cannot open it because it is not registered.
Celestine
I copy the text, then delete

Title :: Mascarpone at home
Author :: Promi
Subsection :: Dishes from dairy products
Ingredients ::

* 1 l. fresh sour cream (or cream) 25% fat
* 1/4 tsp. citric acid
* 1 tsp water
*
* and also - a lint-free towel (linen or cotton), sieve / colander

Description ::
he mascarpone and mascarpone in Africa

Heat sour cream or cream to 75 degrees Celsius. Dissolve citric acid in a teaspoon of water, quickly add to hot cream and stir thoroughly. Continue heating over low heat, stirring constantly for 10 minutes, maintaining the temperature of the cream at 75C.
Line a sieve or colander with a tea towel folded in two, place on a plate (so that the whey drains) and pour the hot cream into the sieve. After 1-1.5 hours, when the mass looks like a batter, collect the resulting cheese mass with a spoon and put it in the refrigerator.
Lyulek
Well done! Already tried sour cream !!! What? This is an idea! And I will try. All the same, sour cream is much easier to get than 35% cream.
I'll do it, compare the results.
Celestine
"President", for example, has 30% sour cream .. though there will be sourness there, it's not cream.
Lyulek
I’m just from this snapshot and will try, because only it is whipped normally
vi_kon
Quote: Lyulёk

Well done! Already tried sour cream !!! What? This is an idea! And I will try. All the same, sour cream is much easier to get than 35% cream.
I'll do it, compare the results.

Why sour cream again?
To obtain mascarpone from sour cream, it is usually simply weighed overnight.
Aunt Besya
"Valio" has sour cream as much as 42% yellow, so dense and tasty, but very fatty, but I didn't even knock on the head to make a mascarpone out of it by means of a "plumb line"
vi_kon
The main problem is to find fresh non-acidic sour cream.
Therefore, of course, the market is best suited. And with the store, you often can't guess.
Rina
Lyulёk, for mascarpone I take sour cream "7th" in a bucket. True, I find her only in the METRO
Lyulek
Quote: Rina72

Lyulёk, for mascarpone I take sour cream "7th" in a bucket. True, I find her only in the METRO
Thank you very much!!! And I was just going to the Metro!
nut
Girls who ever made mascarpone from sour cream 1 liter? How much is this mascarpone? In a meringue roll you need 150g - how much sour cream is needed then?
Rina
It is difficult to say how much of 1 liter will turn out - sour cream is very different. I had 1 kg of whey dripping (if my memory serves me) about a glass. Theoretically, 300 g of sour cream should be enough for 150 g of cheese (assuming the fat content of sour cream is 20-25%, and mascarpone is about 40%). I would do it "with a margin" - from 500 g of sour cream. You can always use excess cheese.
Cilia
Rina72 How do you taste sour cream mascarpone, no sourness? and what sour cream was made of? how long did it weigh in the refrigerator?
Rina
I have a suspicion that in the "real" mascarpone there will also be a slight sourness, it is fermented with citric acid. I wrote my thoughts on the possible differences between sour cream mascarpone and cream (with citric acid and heated to curdling).

I took sour cream from the factory "7Ya" or "Cremez", as fresh as possible, so there was almost no sourness in the final product. Weighed it in the refrigerator (or rather, tied it with a gauze-type cloth and put it in a colander under oppression) when it was night, when it was 4-5 hours. Then you need to look at the resulting result. I cooked cheese from a fairly large amount of sour cream, so the resulting curd had a fairly dense curd on the outside, and the middle remained slightly liquid (when I made the filling for cheesecake, weighed sour cream was counted not as pure mascarpone, but as a mixture of mascarpone and sour cream / cream). If you take 0.3-0.5 liters of sour cream, then the whey will drain, how to say, more completely.
Cilia
Rina72 , thanks for such a detailed answer !!!
nut
Can someone show you the packaging of a shop mascorpone, please
Aunt Besya
And what interests: what does the package look like or the cheese itself? I have an unopened package ... I can take a picture
Rina
The fact is that in our market this cheese is far from one manufacturer. Please, here in similar packs you can buy

img_3723.jpg
Mascarpone from 35% cream at home
nut
Something won't open
nelya
Girls, I tried to make mascarpone even earlier (since I was constantly at the cook, before coming here) the one that did not work out with cottage cheese and cream twice, the mass did not "puff" and I gave up this business, the experiment is too expensive beat Lyulyok, if it's not a secret, at what price you sell cream (those that you often see in the photo), otherwise I only see "President" in Lviv ... 1l 35% costs 65 UAH. so two packs went nowhere for me ... it's a shame to do something according to the recipe, it's almost impossible, but it didn't come out ... I still sin on cottage cheese, maybe I chose not that one. I took the "Curd Tradition" 15%
Lyulek
I buy 35% cream only from Pereyaslav-Khmelnitsky.
Cost: 7.50 UAH for 450ml
I.e. liter -16 UAH
I suspect that the Presidential cream is processed against souring, since Pereyaslavski ones even turn sour in the refrigerator on the third day
nelya
Quote: Lyulёk

I buy 35% cream only from Pereyaslav-Khmelnitsky.
Cost: 7.50 UAH for 450ml
I.e. liter -16 UAH
I suspect that the Presidential cream is processed against souring, since Pereyaslavski ones even turn sour in the refrigerator on the third day
wow, the difference ... but in Lviv I didn’t even come across these ... but after reading Temka, I realized that it was possible to make sour cream. My grandmother from the village gives me the cream (from the separator) that in a day it becomes butter and you can't pick it out from the jar, you have to dilute it with milk, and in undiluted form they are like new in a month.Fair! today I have this "sour cream" from 28.08.09 and even the smell has not changed

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