Sourdough rye bread (100% without additives)

Category: Sourdough bread
Sourdough rye bread (100% without additives)

Ingredients

peeled rye flour (in dough / in dough) 200/270 g
mother starter culture (in a dough) 20 g
water (in dough / in dough) 160/215 ml
salt (in dough) 9 g

Cooking method

  • For the dough, mix the mother's starter culture, flour and water. Cover the container and leave for 12-16 hours at 24 g. C. Then mix the whole dough (except for 20 g) with water, salt and flour. Stir for 5 minutes and leave to ferment for 1 hour. Transfer the dough to a mold, cover and leave to proof for 90 minutes. Preheat the oven to 240 degrees C, put a bowl of water on the bottom. Bake for 15 minutes at 240 ° C with steam, 25 minutes at 220 ° C (removing the bowl of water). Cool on a wire rack, wrapped in a towel. It is recommended to cut and eat rye bread 24 hours after baking.
  • Sourdough rye bread (100% without additives)

The dish is designed for

loaf 700 g

Cooking program:

oven

Note

Originally it was Bread with 66% rye flour from Hamelman's book "Bread. Technology and Recipes". I did it already on the "machine". And the last time I decided to experiment and not add wheat flour to the dough. I was very pleased with the result. The bread turned out to be porous and light (if I may say so about rye bread). And this is all the more surprising, since the mother's leaven was young. For comparison, bread according to the original recipe 🔗

-Elena-
If you add brewed rye malt to the dough, the bread will be denser and more moist. I added to the one according to the original recipe.
salomeya29
Yeah, that's probably on your recipe I'll learn to bake rye bread. It's kind of simple, but the result is simple.
I don’t know how many times I bake pure rye bread according to different recipes, but all one thing turns out - almost not porous, slightly moist and slightly sticky crumb ...
I'm in a state of frustration ... White turns out, but rye - nothing!
-Elena-
Anastasia! Try it first with the addition of wheat flour (140 g of rye and 170 g of wheat in the dough instead of 270 g of rye). See how leaven works. It is different for everyone. I have equal parts of starter, water and flour in my mother's leaven. I usually keep the starter in the refrigerator. In the morning I take it out, warm it up, feed it 1: 1: 1, in the evening I knead the dough. The next morning I knead the dough and bake the bread. Try it, it should work.
Sana
And how did the starter do?
-Elena-
Sana, for the first time from Hamelman's book (see note). And this time I took 50 g of rye flour and 50 ml of water, stirred it and left it for 24 hours. A day later, I took 50 g from the first portion, added flour and water 1: 1, left it for 24 hours. And so on up to 5 times. Maybe this is not very correct, but the bread turned out. Actually, starter and mother starter are one and the same, I think so. It was just necessary to somehow explain the process. As I said above, I store the starter in the refrigerator for up to 6-7 days. Then I feed and bake bread.
salomeya29
Flax, I have a rye sourdough of 100% moisture, bred for a long time and does not work badly. Here is a photo, according to the recipe for the dough I spent the night in the refrigerator, this photo was taken in the morning ... The flour here is only rye ...Sourdough rye bread (100% without additives)
But the bread on this dough turned out as always (wet, etc.)
So I can't understand what I'm doing wrong ...

Quote: -Elena-

Anastasia! Try it first with the addition of wheat flour (140 g of rye and 170 g of wheat in the dough instead of 270 g of rye). See how leaven works. It is different for everyone. I have equal parts of starter, water and flour in my mother's leaven. I usually keep the starter in the refrigerator. In the morning I take it out, warm it up, feed it 1: 1: 1, in the evening I knead the dough. The next morning I knead the dough and bake the bread. Try it, it should work.
I met many recipes where rye bread with the addition of white flour is baked, but I resisted - I want to achieve a good result with pure rye flour! I'm persistent, if something doesn't work out, I will try again and again .... Others succeed, and since this is generally possible, then I can, I just make a mistake somewhere!
The main thing is to understand what exactly the error is, and the rest is a matter of technology, experience, that is ...
Now we will finish the bread according to the local bread-baking recipe and next week I will start eating your rye. Will you help me?
-Elena-
Nastya! I do not understand, was the dough in the refrigerator?
-Elena-
It seems to me that rye dough loves warmth. When I baked bread with yeast, I put the dough on the radiator. I also keep the sourdough warm, and the dough, and the dough.
-Elena-
I apologize for the verbosity I think that usually wheat dough is kept in the refrigerator, this is how gluten develops better. Rye flour is gluten free, so there is no need for cold. This is my purely personal opinion. Although the photo is a beautiful dough. And another such moment. At first, I mixed the starter from the refrigerator almost immediately into the dough. The bread turned out to be denser, although the dough seemed well-fermented. And then I decided to do a preliminary "feeding" of the starter, as I wrote in post # 3. And only then I knead the dough. The bread has become with a well-raised roof. But this is with wheat flour. Pure rye bread has a flatter roof, but the crumb is very airy.
salomeya29
Yes. Stood in the refrigerator all night. Here is the prescription - https://Mcooker-enn.icdself.com/in...on=com_smf&topic=397647.0
And I also began to activate the starter, then make the dough and then according to the recipe ...
Well, in general, I will try.
I honestly do not understand the consistency of the dough. Water can go more or less, depending on the flour. Maybe I need to add less water?
I'll go with YouTube and consult ...
-Elena-
Nastya, I make such a dough consistency to bake tin bread. If you need a hearth, just add flour. My dough is rather viscous, I practically dump it into a mold, level it with a spatula and that's it. I cover it with a plastic bag and put it on the proofer.
Tanjushka-topotushka
Elena, good afternoon! I want to try to bake bread according to your recipe, I have a question: 20 grams of sourdough is how much, if measured with spoons? And I can't understand, you write
Quote: Sana
I have equal parts of starter, water and flour in my mother's leaven. I usually keep the starter in the refrigerator. In the morning I take it out, warm it up, feed it 1: 1: 1, in the evening I knead the dough. The next morning I knead the dough and bake the bread. Try it, it should work.
For example, I have a 1/2 0.5-liter jar starter in my refrigerator, do I need to take some part of it? Or all that would warm and feed 1: 1: 1? And then take 20 grams from here for dough? And put the leftovers in the refrigerator and then put 20gr of the court dough or am I misunderstanding something? Forgive me if I don't understand I ask a question
-Elena-
Tanjushka-topotushka, good evening! I'll try to explain. I have sourdough in the refrigerator for several days. Before baking bread for the day (in the morning) I take it out, warm it up, take 20 g of sourdough, water and flour. I leave it until evening. In the evening I take 20 g of refreshed sourdough and knead the dough. The remaining sourdough is either transferred to wheat or thrown away. Since in the morning I will put 20 g of dough into a jar and put it in the refrigerator. I usually don't store a lot of starter culture. 20 g is enough for me. If you do not have scales, it is very difficult to keep the proportion, because in the same volume there are different weights of different ingredients. If something is not clear, ask
Tanjushka-topotushka
Good evening! Thank you very much for the clarification, now it is clear that only 20 grams are stored in the refrigerator. leaven
irina tukina
Tanjushka-topotushka, good evening! I'll try to explain. I have sourdough in the refrigerator for several days. Before baking bread for the day (in the morning) I take it out, warm it up, take 20 g of sourdough, water and flour. I leave it until evening. In the evening I take 20 g of refreshed sourdough and knead the dough. The remaining sourdough is either transferred to wheat or thrown away. Since in the morning I will put 20 g of dough into a jar and put it in the refrigerator.I usually don't store a lot of starter culture. 20 g is enough for me. If you do not have scales, it is very difficult to keep the proportion, because in the same volume there are different weights of different ingredients.

Elena, thanks for the answer to Tanya. But I also had a question.
1. If you take 20 gr. starter + 20 gr. rye flour + 20 gr. water. It turns out 60 gr. refreshed sourdough?
Lena, and if, for example, the recipe says: leaven 140 g, etc. And I have, for example, only 20 g starter in the refrigerator. And how do I arrive at 140 grams of leaven?
And another question:
2. For example a recipe like this (yours)
Ingredients:
peeled rye flour (dough / dough) 200/270 g
mother starter culture (dough) 20 g
water (dough / dough) 160/215 ml
salt (in dough) 9 g
According to the recipe, it turns out that all flour requires 470g + 20g. to refresh the starter culture = 490 gr., take 375 ml of water + 20 ml took to refresh the starter culture = 395 ml.
I understand correctly? Isn't there much water for so much flour?
And the weight is probably more than a kilogram?
I really look forward to hearing from you, as I will bake bread on Friday.

-Elena-
irina tukina, Irina! I'll start at the end I think the water is okay, because the dough is not steep. I shift it into a mold with a spatula. I don't know by weight, I didn't weigh it. But I have been baking bread according to this recipe for more than a year, I like it. Now about the leaven. After refreshing, I take only 20 g, throw away the rest. After fermenting the dough, I take 20 g for the starter. And so endlessly. But about 140 g of sourdough - so this is probably about wheat sourdough, because if you take 140 g of rye, then this bread cannot be eaten (it turns out very sour). I tried to put 40 g in a brew, too much. The original recipe only needs 10 g of starter. But if you translate from rye to wheat, then you need to feed several times in progression, i.e. 20 g starter + 20 g psh. flour + 20 ml of water. Then 60 g + 60 g + 60 ml. You can feed it again, but take so much starter to get 140 g of sourdough at the exit. Here's something like this If anything, ask.
irina tukina

Sourdough 80 g
Dough water 375 ml
Dough water 260 ml
Salt 1.5 tsp
Rye flour for dough 220 g
Rye flour for dough 520 g
Lena thanks for the answer. But here is the above recipe from Vatrusha from this site.
And I took the Stolichny Bread recipe from YouTube, the ingredients are as follows:
Sourdough - 140 gr
Water - 77 gr
Rye flour - 132 gr
Dough:
Rye flour - 100 gr
Millet flour. 1 grade - 290 g
Water - 240 g (total)
Salt - 9 gr
Sugar - 18 g
Then it is already completely incomprehensible to me. Please help me figure it out. I think it will be interesting for other novice bakers too.
-Elena-
irina tukina, Irina! To be honest, I don't understand either. The first recipe contains even more water than mine. But with the second ... Maybe this is the case when the starter is fed several times, but only with rye flour, without transferring to wheat sourdough? Therefore, there is so much of it.
Or maybe the leaven of a different consistency and not so sour. It seems to me that there is very little water in the second recipe. In general, there are many recipes for rye-wheat bread with sourdough, you can search and compare. I wanted to bake pure rye bread. Although, as I said earlier, it was originally a recipe for mixed bread, I just did an experiment. Sorry for not helping to figure it out. I also learn from others all the time.
irina tukina
Lena, do you bake your bread in the L7 formula?
-Elena-
No, I have a little less - L10.
irina tukina
Then mine will definitely fit. Lena once again thank you very much for your help.
Stacey
Hello!
Please tell me what could be the matter - the bread has a beautiful crust, but very hard, and the crumb inside seems to be damp, sticky. I bake in the oven.
Ozzy
Good day everyone! Can you please tell me, I baked bread for the second time in a cast-iron pan with a diameter of 28 cm, but it was not baked inside me, although the baking time was 2.5 hours and the temperature was 180 degrees, and it stood with me all night under a towel. And the dough has risen twice before being sent to the oven, I sin on a large diameter frying pan! Please tell me, I'm attaching photos Sourdough rye bread (100% without additives)
Viki
Quote: Ozzy
I am sinning on a large diameter frying pan!
Igor, the diameter of the pan is really big. This is problem number one. There is also a second: a cast-iron frying pan. This means that it keeps the temperature well, but it takes a long time to warm up for this. Bread molds are usually made from aluminum-based alloys for this very reason.
Elena_Kamch
Quote: Ozzy
temperature 180 degrees
Ozzy, Igor, personally, I always bake rye bread at a higher temperature. I preheat the oven to 270 degrees, put bread in a preheated pan (I also baked in a cast-iron pan), after 15 minutes I lower the temperature to 220 degrees. In general, baking lasts about an hour and 10-15 minutes.
Try experimenting with temperature. At the beginning of my baking experience, I also baked on a low bake, it turned out some kind of horror, not bread ...
Ozzy
Thank you very much, Viki and Elena_Kamch! ) I'll try this week, bought a thermometer in the oven and a baking dish.
Tumanchik
And I would say that there may still be a problem in the test itself. Look at the crumb structure. In theory, with such a long baking time, a thick crust should have turned out. And I see bread that has not risen, has not ripened (or, on the contrary, fermented and opal). I would like to see your dough and preparation before baking.
Ozzy
I will post pictures next time!
Igch
Thanks for the recipe! The bread turned out to be very tasty. Mine are still asking)))
Irina P
Elena, please tell me what is the temperature during fermentation and proofing.
Thank you
-Elena-
Quote: Irina P

Elena, please tell me what is the temperature during fermentation and proofing.
Thank you
Irina, excuse me, began to rarely visit the site. I think that the answer is no longer relevant. But still. I always put it in the oven for fermentation and proofing with the light on. It turns out 28-30 degrees.
IrinaP1
Thank you, Elena! Very relevant. It is always useful to listen to an experienced person! And I also want to say a big thank you for your recipe! I floundered for almost a year with a recipe with 100g of sourdough. And I tried yours - a completely different matter!
-Elena-
Quote: IrinaP1

Thank you, Elena! Very relevant. It is always useful to listen to an experienced person! And I also want to say a big thank you for your recipe! I floundered for almost a year with a recipe with 100g of sourdough. And I tried yours - a completely different matter!
Irina! Thanks for the "experienced person"! Although I'm not experienced at all, I just love the process of baking bread and try to get to the bottom of it. Earlier, I also could not understand what it means "Take 200 g of leaven". Then I already guessed that it was a fed starter (10-15 g).
IrinaP1
Elena, why does the bread fall in the oven? And it fits perfectly! A couple of times it turned out with such a small slide well, almost like yours, and then that's it ... The bread is nevertheless edible, perforated, but it shouldn't fall ... Tell me, please. Thank you.
-Elena-
Irina! I do not even know what to say. It would be nice to have a photo of the preparation before baking and the finished bread. Is the dough too wet? Or overstayed in proofing. It happens to me too when I am late with baking.
Lord 68
Sourdough rye bread (100% without additives)
Sourdough rye bread (100% without additives)
This is my bread. Only rye flour, rye sourdough, salt water and a couple of drops of stevia extract instead of sugar. I bake in the oven without water. Immediately I make 2 loaves of 1.2 kg each. Stored for two weeks. Does not grow moldy, does not dry out. The result of almost a year of experiments and now I have been baking this way for the second year already. I warm up the oven to 240 degrees, set the regulator to 170 degrees and put the bread on for 45 minutes. Then I stick the thermometer probe into the middle of the loaf and bake it to 96 grams inside. I wrap it in a towel for several hours, if I bake in the evening, then overnight.
-Elena-
Lord 68, Alexander! Good bread! By the way, about the steam. I recently read an article about rye bread. It says that different types of bread do not need steam. And she herself also stopped putting the bowl of water.
Lord 68
Forgot to add. For the last six months, rye bran has always been added to bread. I pray in a blender, although there are already ground ones in stores.
IrinaP1
Quote: -Elena-
Irina! I do not even know what to say. It would be nice to have a photo of the preparation before baking and the finished bread. Is the dough too wet? Or overstayed in proofing.It happens to me too when I am late with baking.
Elena, thanks for your answer! Wet dough - maybe I'll try less water. Here Alexander's bread is denser than yours, that is, less water. I would like to get like yours, with big holes. Here is a photo. Thanks again.









I can't put a photo.
Lord 68
IrinaP1. The density of bread does not always depend on the moisture content of the dough. More from the quality of the flour. By the way, my bread is not very dense, just my photos further. I just pulled out a couple of my loaves. Relaxing in a towel. Tomorrow, if I don't forget, I'll take a closer photo. And of course, pure rye bread, especially with the addition of 20% rye bran, will always be denser than the same Darnitsk bread.
IrinaP1
Sourdough rye bread (100% without additives)
Hooray, it worked! Not bread but a photo
-Elena-
IrinaP1, Irina! Yes, there may be damp dough. Try adding less water first, then looking at the dough as you knead. You can also try a little less proofing. In short, an eternal experiment
IrinaP1
Elena, made less water. Well, this one did not seem to fall. But it also did not rise much. The structure is denser as I expected, and less sour - generally better. But it's far from ideal
Sourdough rye bread (100% without additives)





Alexander, can you supply your recipe?
-Elena-
IrinaP1, Irina! Or maybe there is something wrong with the leaven?
Newbie
Quote: -Elena-
I store the starter in the refrigerator for up to 6-7 days
and does not peroxide? I want it too, teach
-Elena-
Newbie, rye sourdough lives well in the cold. If you bake bread 2-3 times a week, then it is always fresh, since a new portion is taken from the dough. And if less often, then I first update it (in the morning), and in the evening I start dough. In the morning I take 20 grams and put them in the refrigerator.
Newbie
Quote: -Elena-
In the morning I take 20 grams and put them in the refrigerator.
that is, do you remove the ripened sourdough at the peak? and then what happens to her in the withers? She will fall and so worth a week? Well, in principle, this is not critical for rye sourdough, it does not have gluten, but what does it taste like - nuclear sour? no, well, it's good for the black one, I don't have enough sourness in rye from the wheat sourdough, I overfeed it in rye.
-Elena-
Newbie, not, firstly, for the dough, I take 10 g of a starter. Secondly, when I take it (starter) out of the refrigerator, I sniff. Usually the smell is very pleasant. And how bad it can be if the starter is updated all the time. I bake wheat bread on a rye starter, the same 10 grams. There is no sourness. I don’t bake rye bread with wheat sourdough. What's the point? Yes, if I take the dough to the starter, then it is already at its peak in the morning. And if I just update, then I clean it in 1-2 hours.
Lord 68
Newbie. Try sourdough like this. I keep it and wake up almost like Elena's, but. I have more volume. This is about half a can of 0.5 liters. Store in the refrigerator for 2 weeks. In the evening I put it in a bowl. I add 200 g of rye flour and 250 ml of water. I leave it to wander in the room for the night. In the morning, I put 0.5 liters from it into a jar to 1/3 of the volume, add a large, heaped tablespoon of rye flour and add water drop by drop to stir it to get the consistency of thick sour cream. And immediately put it in the refrigerator. By the way, Elena is right, the leaven should smell nice. I can't explain the smell. All that remains in the bowl goes to the bread as leaven. One more thing, the starter culture must be kept in the refrigerator and must breathe, i.e. there should be small holes in the lid.

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